Main.TabletopInteractionTechniques History

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  • Carpendale, S., Isenberg, T., Scott, S.D., Hinrichs, U., Miede, A., Kruger, R., Habelski, S., Inkpen, K.M. (2006). Collaborative Interaction on Large Tabletop Displays. Conference Supplement of CSCW 2006: ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, November 4-8, 2006, Banff, AB, Canada, pp.57-58.
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  • Carpendale, S., Isenberg, T., Scott, S.D., Hinrichs, U., Miede, A., Kruger, R., Habelski, S., Inkpen, K.M. (2006). Collaborative Interaction on Large Tabletop Displays. Conference Supplement of CSCW 2006: ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, November 4-8, 2006, Banff, AB, Canada, pp. 57-58.
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'Tabletop Workspace Carpendale, S., Isenberg, T., Scott, S.D., Hinrichs, U., Miede, A., Kruger, R., Habelski, S., Inkpen, K.M. (2006). Collaborative Interaction on Large Tabletop Displays. Conference Supplement of CSCW 2006: ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, November 4-8, 2006, Banff, AB, Canada, pp.57-58.

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Tabletop Workspace

  • Carpendale, S., Isenberg, T., Scott, S.D., Hinrichs, U., Miede, A., Kruger, R., Habelski, S., Inkpen, K.M. (2006). Collaborative Interaction on Large Tabletop Displays. Conference Supplement of CSCW 2006: ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, November 4-8, 2006, Banff, AB, Canada, pp.57-58.
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'Tabletop Workspace Carpendale, S., Isenberg, T., Scott, S.D., Hinrichs, U., Miede, A., Kruger, R., Habelski, S., Inkpen, K.M. (2006). Collaborative Interaction on Large Tabletop Displays. Conference Supplement of CSCW 2006: ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, November 4-8, 2006, Banff, AB, Canada, pp.57-58.

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  In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. e also noticed that the ability to move piles around on the table appeared important for fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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  In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. We also noticed that the ability to move piles around on the table appeared important for fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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  See the storage bin video to view the RNT technique in action.
   
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  Download video (.avi)Note the TechSmith/Camtasia codec might be needed to play this video.
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  Download video (.avi) Note the TechSmith/Camtasia codec might be needed to play this video.
April 04, 2006, at 11:01 AM by 18.34.5.117 -
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  Download video (.avi)Note the TechSmith/Camtasia codec might be needed to play this video.
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November 19, 2005, at 01:28 PM by 18.34.5.117 -
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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces: Project Overview

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces: Project Overview

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Traditional tables are often the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.
Photo (c) Calgary SUN 

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  Traditional tables are often the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.
  Photo (c) Calgary SUN 

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 In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed

the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. We also noticed that the ability to move piles around on the table appeared important for fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.||

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  In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. e also noticed that the ability to move piles around on the table appeared important for fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed

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 In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed
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tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.||

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Rotation N Translation (RNT)

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Rotation 'N Translation (RNT)

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Related Papers

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  • Sheelagh Carpendale
  • Uta Hinrichs
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Project Contacts

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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration

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Rotation 'N Translation (RNT): Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration

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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration
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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Storage Bins: Mobile Storage for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces
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Storage Bins: Mobile Storage for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Interface Currents: Enabling Fluid Data Sharing and Exploration on a Collaborative Tabletop Workspace
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Related Papers

Interface Currents: Enabling Fluid Data Sharing and Exploration on a Collaborative Tabletop Workspace

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Related Papers
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Storage Bins: Mobile Storage for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Storage Bins: Mobile Storage for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces
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Interface Currents: Enabling Fluid Data Sharing and Exploration on a Collaborative Tabletop Workspace

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Interface Currents: Enabling Fluid Data Sharing and Exploration on a Collaborative Tabletop Workspace
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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration

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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration
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the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. Our observations showed that the ability to move piles around on the table was important to enable fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital

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the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. We also noticed that the ability to move piles around on the table appeared important for fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital

November 19, 2005, at 12:39 PM by 18.34.5.117 -
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the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. Our observations showed that the ability to relocate piles on the table was important to enable fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital

to:

the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. Our observations showed that the ability to move piles around on the table was important to enable fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital

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The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

to:

In our investigations of traditional tabletop collaboration, we repeatedly observed the practice of casual piling to facilitate organization and sharing of task resources. For example, during a furniture layout task, collaborators moved piles of paper furniture icons around in the main work area so that different group members could obtain items from the pile as they were creating furniture arrangements. Our observations showed that the ability to relocate piles on the table was important to enable fluid sharing and accessing of tabletop items. To facilitate this casual piling behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the Storage Bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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Photo credit: Calgary SUN 

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Photo (c) Calgary SUN 

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Photo: Calgary SUN 

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Photo credit: Calgary SUN 

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(c) 2005 Calgary SUN 

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Photo: Calgary SUN 

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Photo: (c) 2005 Calgary SUN 

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(c) 2005 Calgary SUN 

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Photo: (c) 2005 Calgary SUN  

Traditional tables are often the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.

to:
Traditional tables are often the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.
Photo: (c) 2005 Calgary SUN 

November 19, 2005, at 12:22 PM by 18.34.5.117 -
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Traditional tables have long been the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, scheduling, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.

to:

Traditional tables are often the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.

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Traditional tables have long been the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, scheduling, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. To address this issue, a collaborative effort has been underway to develop new interfaces and interaction techniques better suited to a interactive digital tabletop workspace. Our approach to the problem has been to first conduct a number of in-depth observational studies of traditional tabletop collaboration to help us understand how people interact on a table when using traditional (i.e., pen and paper-based) media and try to leverage these familiar interaction practices in our new digital interaction and interface designs.

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Traditional tables have long been the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, scheduling, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. This might, in part, stem from a lack of suitable tools for organizing and sharing information. The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

to:

The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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sharing information. The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace. ||

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sharing information. The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace.

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Traditional tables have long been the preferred work environment for many collaboration tasks such as planning, scheduling, brainstorming, design, and layout activities. Unfortunately, collaborating at current digital tabletop displays is often awkward and frustrating. This might, in part, stem from a lack of suitable tools for organizing and sharing information. The ability to store resource items anywhere in the workspace and move them around can be critical for coordinating task and group interactions on a table. However, existing casual storage techniques for digital workspaces only provide access to stored items at the periphery of the workspace, potentially compromising collaborative interactions at a digital tabletop display. To facilitate this storage behavior in a digital tabletop workspace, we developed the storage bin mobile storage mechanism, which combines the space-preserving features of existing peripheral storage mechanisms with the capability to relocate stored items in the workspace. ||

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RNT: Rotation 'N Translation: Providing Fluid Access to Tabletop Items During Collaboration

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Interface Currents: Enabling Fluid Data Sharing and Exploration on a Collaborative Tabletop Workspace

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Photo: (c)2005 Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c) 2005 Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c) 2005, Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c)2005 Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c) Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c) 2005, Calgary SUN  
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Photo: (c) Calgary SUN  

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Photo: (c) Calgary SUN  

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Storage Bins: Mobile Storage for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Interaction Techniques for Collaborative Tabletop Workspaces

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Storage Bins

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Interface Currents

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RNT

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